Christmas Trees

Themes: Christmas

Impact:
Effort:
Cost saving:
£: No up-front costs
Christmas tree

Description

For many, Christmas trees are a key part of Christmas celebrations, but in recent years, many people have become more concerned about their impact on the climate.

What to buy

Unless you already have one, it’s best to avoid artificial trees which are made from plastic, PVC and metal. They’re often produced in countries like China where factories are powered by fossil fuels, then shipped around the world, only to ultimately end up in landfill as they can’t be recycled.

According to Which Magazine, up to 8 million real trees are bought each year, and there are ways you can still have a tree without damaging the planet:

  • Source an FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) Certified tree
  • Source it organically
  • Source it locally

or better still rent a potted tree, or buy a potted tree – you can replant and dig up each

year to make your own tradition.

You can support a local cause such as Refutrees – Christmas Tree Shop — Aid Box Community or check to see if your local school or other charitable cause are selling trees.

How to recycle

If you buy a real tree, make sure to keep an eye on collection dates for your area, so you can leave it out for Bristol Waste to collect from your doorstep and recycle.

What happens to recycled Christmas trees? – Bristol Waste Company

Or here are 5 other ways you can re-use your tree.

Tree alternatives

However, buying or renting a tree can be costly, and with the cost-of-living crisis, many will be looking for ways to update how they celebrate Christmas. Before trees became an established tradition, people would decorate fallen branches, place logs in a pyramid shape, and gather winter foliage to hang above doors and windows. So why not get foraging in your local green spaces this winter, and get creative with your findings, with the added bonus of boosting your wellbeing with time in nature! Here are some more interesting suggestions.

Useful links

Christmas Trees

Themes: Christmas

Impact:
Effort:
Cost saving:
£: No up-front costs
Christmas tree

Description

For many, Christmas trees are a key part of Christmas celebrations, but in recent years, many people have become more concerned about their impact on the climate.

What to buy

Unless you already have one, it’s best to avoid artificial trees which are made from plastic, PVC and metal. They’re often produced in countries like China where factories are powered by fossil fuels, then shipped around the world, only to ultimately end up in landfill as they can’t be recycled.

According to Which Magazine, up to 8 million real trees are bought each year, and there are ways you can still have a tree without damaging the planet:

  • Source an FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) Certified tree
  • Source it organically
  • Source it locally

or better still rent a potted tree, or buy a potted tree – you can replant and dig up each

year to make your own tradition.

You can support a local cause such as Refutrees – Christmas Tree Shop — Aid Box Community or check to see if your local school or other charitable cause are selling trees.

How to recycle

If you buy a real tree, make sure to keep an eye on collection dates for your area, so you can leave it out for Bristol Waste to collect from your doorstep and recycle.

What happens to recycled Christmas trees? – Bristol Waste Company

Or here are 5 other ways you can re-use your tree.

Tree alternatives

However, buying or renting a tree can be costly, and with the cost-of-living crisis, many will be looking for ways to update how they celebrate Christmas. Before trees became an established tradition, people would decorate fallen branches, place logs in a pyramid shape, and gather winter foliage to hang above doors and windows. So why not get foraging in your local green spaces this winter, and get creative with your findings, with the added bonus of boosting your wellbeing with time in nature! Here are some more interesting suggestions.

Useful links

Can you suggest an action?

Let us know what you think is missing – or tell us about something else you do to reduce your impact.